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  • David Bild, Museum Educator Heads to London for MozFest

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    Tags: nature museum, science education, mozfest, mozilla, chicago summer of learning, digital badges, STEM

    Created: 10/24/2013      Updated: 10/24/2013

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    Hi! My name is David Bild and I am one of 14 Educators at the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum. I work on a wide variety of programming which serves middle and high school-aged students, middle school teachers, and undergraduates.

    Photo of Museum Educator David Bild

    I’m also involved with Hive Chicago, which is a network of 57 youth-serving organizations dedicated to transforming the learning landscape in Chicago by enacting connected learning experiences. Through Hive, which is funded by MacArthur’s Digital Media and Learning (DML) initiative, I have been heavily involved in digital badging initiatives including the Chicago Summer of Learning and the recently formed Hive funded C-STEMM Digital Badges Working Group with Chicago Botanic Garden, Adler Planetarium, Chicago Architecture Foundation, Project Exploration, Forall Badges, and After School Matters. It is truly an exciting time for Hive Chicago and Connected Learning.

    As I write this blog post, I’m sitting at the airport getting ready to board an eight hour flight to the Mozilla Festival (MozFest) in London. The Mozilla Foundation runs Hive Networks in Chicago, New York, Pittsburgh and is working to extend Hive globally.  I was lucky enough to be selected by Mozilla to serve as one of five Hive Ambassadors representing Hive Chicago at MozFest. Joining me on the trip are four other Hive Ambassadors from Chicago which include representatives from Shedd Aquarium, LevelUP, Yollocalli Arts Reach, and Game Changer Chicago.

    I’m not quite sure what to expect, but I’m super excited to learn from and share with people from across the globe to bring back innovative ideas and strategies to help us continue to improve the learning landscape in Chicago through connected learning principles. Keep an eye out for blog and twitter updates from me during #MozFest.

    Cheers!

    David Bild
    Museum Educator

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  • Paleontology Underfoot – Celebrating National Fossil Day

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    Tags: fossil, paleontology, Mazon Creek, Illinois

    Created: 10/16/2013      Updated: 8/9/2016

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    How often do you think about the ground under your feet? About what it is composed of or how old the rocks are? Did you know that under your feet, there are not just rocks and soils, but fossils? Most of Illinois’ exposed rock layers, and the fossils found in them, were formed during the Carboniferous, approximately 355 to 290 million years ago. Check out the Paleontology Portal’s website about Illinois’ paleontology and geology, http://www.paleoportal.org/index.php?globalnav=time_space&sectionnav=state&name=Illinois.

     

    The Chicago Academy of Sciences and its Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum (CAS/PNNM) has over 22,000 fossils in its collection, most of which were collected from sites in the Midwest. To celebrate National Fossil Day, here are some specimens from CAS/PNNM’s paleontology collection.

    Macroneuropteris macrophylla fossil

    Macroneuropteris macrophylla, a Neuropteris-like group seed fern from the Braidwood flora of the Mazon Creek area, IL. Carboniferous, Francis Creek Shale.

    Spirorbis sp. fossil 

    Spirorbis sp. (on Stigmaria sp.), worms on root structure, from the Essex fauna and flora of the Mazon Creek area, IL. Carboniferous, Francis Creek Shale.

     Lobatopteris lamuriana fossil

    Lobatopteris lamuriana, a true fern from the Braidwood flora of the Mazon Creek area, IL. Carboniferous, Francis Creek Shale.

     Hystriciola delicatala fossil

    Hystriciola delicatala, an annelid worm from the Essex fauna of the Mazon Creek area, IL. Carboniferous, Francis Creek Shale.

     Annularia sp. fossils

     Annularia sp. specimens collected by Jonathan H. Britts from Henry County, MO.

     Pecopteris vestita fossil

     Pecopteris vestita, a fern leaf collected by Jonathan H. Britts from Henry County, MO.

     Pentremites obesus fossil

    Pentremites obesus, a blastoid from Anna, IL. Mississippian, Chester Limestone.

     Platystrophia acutilirata fossil

     Platystrophia acutilirata, brachiopods collected from Cincinnati, OH. Ordovician, Cincinnati Limestone.

     Conularia crawfordsvillensis fossil

    Conularia crawfordsvillensis, (animal) collected from Crawfordsville, IN. Mississippian, Keokuk Group.

      Phillipsia bufo fossil

    Phillipsia bufo, a trilobite collected from Crawfordsville, IN. Mississippian, Keokuk Group.

     

    Stop in at the Nature Museum for a visit to see fossils up close. Here are a few of the fossils you can find on display:

    Mammut giganteus, mastodon mandible and tooth from Macon County, IL

    Receptaculites oweni, fossilized coral collected from Galena, IL

    Tremanotus chicagoensis, gastropod (snail) specimen from Bridgeport, IL

    Lepidodentron aculeatum, fossilized bark collected in Orange County, IN

    Calymene niagarensis, trilobite specimens collected from section 6 of the drainage canal, Chicago, IL

    Want to learn more about the fossils under your feet?

    Gugilotta, Guy. “The World’s Largest Fossil Wilderness.” Smithsonian Magazine, July 2009. [Smithsonian.com, http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history-archaeology/Phenomena-Forest-Primeval.html]

    “How Do We Know? – Fossils” webpage on MuseumLink Illinois site. Illinois State Museum, 2000. [http://www.museum.state.il.us/muslink/forest/htmls/how_foss.html] Information about how fossil pollen is used to study past environments.

    Wittry, Jack. Mazon Creek Fossil Fauna. Illinois: ESCONI and Northeastern Illinois University, 2012.  * Includes photographs of specimens from the CAS/PNNM collection!

     

    Dawn Roberts
    Collections Manager

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  • Supper with the Snakes

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    Tags: family, snakes, halloween, family fun, october

    Created: 10/11/2013      Updated: 8/9/2016

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    A few years ago we began a special halloween event for children called Supper with the Snakes. It is a wonderful opportunity for families to don their Halloween costumes for an extra evening and immerse themselves in all things snake related. We will be hosting our sixth Supper with the Snakes event on Saturday, October 26th from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. You can register online here.

    Visitors touching a snake held by a Museum volunteer



    I sometimes wonder, who finds who more intriguing, the children looking at our beautiful snakes, or the snakes looking at all the children in their Halloween costumes!

    Visitors interacting with a snake


    As well as having al of our snakes on show we offer a whole range of snake related acitivites, including "create a snake" crafts, using all kinds of recycled materials.

    Supper with the Snakes craft table



    Fabulous Face Painting

    Visitor getting their face painted



    and a few other surprises that we like to keep under our hat until the night of the event.

    Dad and son at Supper with the Snakes



    After a delicious pizza dinner we announce the costume prizewinners of the night and present them with their prizes.

    Costume contest winner



    This year we have the added bonus of access to our brand new temporary exhibit "Animal Secrets." Then when all the snakes have been petted, all the activities completed, all the exhibits checked out, and all the pizza has been consumed, a snake related goodie is our parting gift as all the participants leave.

    Gift bags


    SSSSSSSee you on the 26th for Ssssssupper with the Ssssssnakes! Ssssssign up now!

    Celeste Troon, Director of Living Collections

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  • Donald T. Ries Photography Collection: A Museum Intern's Perspective

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    Tags: Archives, photography, 35mm slides, Donald T. Ries, flowers, botany

    Created: 10/8/2013      Updated: 8/9/2016

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    Donald T. Ries passed away in 1967. For the past four months I have been the Collections-Photography Intern for the Collections Department, cataloguing Ries’ work that is housed in the Archive. When I applied for the position, I thought I was going to be working more with cameras or scanners, and while that may still be in store for Ries' collection my job so far entails cataloguing, researching, and identifying the subjects of his photographs.

    In 1969, Ries' sisters donated over 10,000 of his nature photography images, in the form of 35 mm slides and black and white negatives to the Academy. Ries’ collection was accessioned into the collection all those years ago but methods for cataloguing have since become more rigorous. Luckily for me, the museum has not had the resources to allocate towards addressing those changes, so Amber and Dawn brought me in to start attending to those needs. Throughout the process I have gained hands-on experience with contemporary cataloguing techniques and object handling. I have also seen just how time consuming and arduous managing and maintaining a museum collection can be; a great lesson for a museum studies graduate student like me.

    Drawers from the storage cabinet received with the Donald T. Ries photography donation

    Drawers from the storage cabinet received with the Donald T. Ries photography donation

    I have thoroughly enjoyed getting to know Donald T. Ries. From my personal research, I found that Ries was a biology professor at Illinois State University and he belonged to an amateur photography club, from which he won several awards. He spent his summers pursuing and working on his passion for nature photography by researching and recording different natural environments and their inhabitants. Ries then spent the time to label most of his images with the appropriate scientific name or taxonomy.

    Chimaphila umbellata, Pipissewa or Prince’s Pine

    Image of Chimaphila umbellata, Pipissewa or Prince’s Pine

    Part of cataloguing Ries’ images involves using the USDA Plants database to verify and confirm the information on Ries’ labels. The database also maps the natural habitats for the flora I am investigating, highlighting the states where they grow naturally. Those maps and the dates on Ries’ slides allow me to “play detective,” inferring in what regions of the country Ries was when he took certain images. My favorite part of the internship has been mentally mapping Ries' travels. I imagine him preferring a trip to southern Canada in July where the Lady Slipper Orchid might be in bloom over a vacation at a beach resort in some tropical climate.

    Cypripedium arietinum, Ram’s Head Lady’s Slipper

    Image of Cypripedium arietinum, Ram’s Head Lady’s Slipper

    Another rewarding aspect entails researching the unidentified slides, trying to find and attribute the correct taxonomy to the species in each image. With little more than a descriptive vocabulary and a growing understanding of the botanical language, I pore over hundreds of images from the Internet trying to discover the species of plant at which I am looking. I cannot describe the satisfaction I receive every time I scour through countless images, and find a flower similar to the slide I am studying; I found the clues necessary to unlock the riddle.

    Oxalis montana, Mountain Woodsorrel

    Image of Oxalis montana, Mountain Woodsorrel

    This experience provided a glimpse at how a Collections Department operates and increased my desire to work in museums. I also gained a greater appreciation for flowers as well as the work of avid nature photographers, even becoming adept at identifying previously unknown species of flowers in my friends’ backyards. Finally, I got to know this fellow photographer, developing a connection to him that could never have otherwise been made. I plan on continuing with the Donald T. Ries project as a volunteer and I am excited to continue working with and learning from the Collections staff at the Academy.

    Leonard M. Cicero
    Collections Department Intern/Volunteer

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