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A #DayofFacts

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Created: 3/1/2017      Updated: 12/28/2017

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We were proud to participate in the first ever Day of Facts on February 17. On that day, 250 organizations across the US and around the world used social media to educate and engage their followers on areas ranging from STEM education to conservation. During that time we shared information about our history, our founders, our education programs, our conservation research, and our upcoming exhibit.

You can check out all of our #DayofFacts posts by checking out our Storify page below.

Day of Facts

Day of Facts

On February 17, 2017 the Chicago Academy of Sciences / Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum took part in #DayofFacts. Here's what we shared!

  1. We’re proud to be Chicago’s oldest museum. #DayofFacts
  2. For 160 years, we’ve worked to connect Chicagoans to nature & science. #DayofFacts https://t.co/AsOQodQm3N
    For 160 years, we’ve worked to connect Chicagoans to nature & science. #DayofFacts pic.twitter.com/AsOQodQm3N
  3. Our efforts have always been based around scientific fact & that continues to this day. #DayofFacts
  4. After studying & working at the Smithsonian, Robert Kennicott sought to establish Midwestern natural history organizations #DayofFacts
  5. Kennicott hoped these Midwestern natural history orgs would develop reputations like the Smithsonian #DayofFacts https://t.co/m5Tk6ax7Nk
    Kennicott hoped these Midwestern natural history orgs would develop reputations like the Smithsonian #DayofFacts pic.twitter.com/m5Tk6ax7Nk
  6. The persistent increase of the Earth’s average surface temperature is known as global warming. #DayofFacts
  7. Kennicott realized his dream when the Chicago Academy of Sciences was founded in 1857 & he was appointed director (president). #DayofFacts
  8. Elizabeth Emerson Atwater (1812-1878) was a noted naturalist & collector who willed her collection to us #DayofFacts https://t.co/uOPUdRgiH2
    Elizabeth Emerson Atwater (1812-1878) was a noted naturalist & collector who willed her collection to us #DayofFacts pic.twitter.com/uOPUdRgiH2
  9. One of her plant specimens was actually pressed between the pages of the Chicago Tribune from the day Abraham Lincoln died. #DayofFacts
  10. Atwater developed her interest in botany while attending boarding school in Troy, New York. #DayofFacts https://t.co/cffxzQ7rpi
    Atwater developed her interest in botany while attending boarding school in Troy, New York. #DayofFacts pic.twitter.com/cffxzQ7rpi
  11. The study of plants was part of the standard curriculum - it was an activity a “proper” lady could take w/ her wherever she went #DayofFacts
  12. On one journey, Atwater collected 2,000 specimens, one of which was later named as a new species of lichen, Bryum atwateriae. #DayofFacts
  13. Herman Silas Pepoon (1860-1941) was a teacher & conservationist devoted to studying plants in IL/Midwest #DayofFacts https://t.co/tHZ7mqZwvG
    Herman Silas Pepoon (1860-1941) was a teacher & conservationist devoted to studying plants in IL/Midwest #DayofFacts pic.twitter.com/tHZ7mqZwvG
  14. Pepoon’s detailed record of Chicago plant species (a local identification source for plants) was published by CAS in 1927. #DayofFacts
  15. In 1909, Pepoon began teaching botanical classes for young people & local teachers at the Academy. #DayofFacts
  16. His detailed illustrations & notes continue to be used for our education dept-led field trip workshops. #DayofFacts https://t.co/uNG0Ght5US
    His detailed illustrations & notes continue to be used for our education dept-led field trip workshops. #DayofFacts pic.twitter.com/uNG0Ght5US
  17. The #DayofFacts provides us with another opportunity to talk about our work & educate our members & visitors.
  18. We're a major provider of innovative science education programs engaging 25000 students & 1700 teachers. #DayofFacts https://t.co/ECEITTIjh4
    We're a major provider of innovative science education programs engaging 25000 students & 1700 teachers. #DayofFacts pic.twitter.com/ECEITTIjh4
  19. This equals nearly 80,000 educational contact hours w/ Chicago teachers & students – more than any other Chicago museum. #DayofFacts
  20. Over 50% of our contact hours are offsite in the schools and communities in Chicago. #DayofFacts #sciencematters https://t.co/DmSJtoT4wN
    Over 50% of our contact hours are offsite in the schools and communities in Chicago. #DayofFacts #sciencematters pic.twitter.com/DmSJtoT4wN
  21. At 27 yrs old, Science on the Go (SOG) is our longest running & most recognized program #DayofFacts #sciencematters https://t.co/qjIjlbhAkd
    At 27 yrs old, Science on the Go (SOG) is our longest running & most recognized program #DayofFacts #sciencematters pic.twitter.com/qjIjlbhAkd
  22. SOG provides high-quality professional development for teachers & hands-on student engagement in underserved Chicago schools. #DayofFacts
  23. Our curricula cover topics like conservation, endangered species, climate change & urban ecology because #sciencematters. #DayofFacts
  24. These are also all topics that our scientists have been working with since our founding. #DayofFacts
  25. Thomas Chrowder Chamberlin was CAS President from 1897-1915 #DayofFacts https://t.co/226PSllFM0
    Thomas Chrowder Chamberlin was CAS President from 1897-1915 #DayofFacts pic.twitter.com/226PSllFM0
  26. Chamberlin actually pioneered the understanding of climate. #DayofFacts
  27. Chamberlin was a glacial geologist & among the first to emphasize CO2’s role in regulating Earth’s temperature. #DayofFacts
  28. He warned that life on Earth as we know it might be short-lived in a geological time scale…(1/2) #dayofFacts
  29. …predicting the potential consequences of climate change. (2/2) #DayofFacts
  30. The terms “global warming” & “climate change” are often used interchangeably, but they actually refer to different things. #DayofFacts
  31. “Global warming” is considered to be only a single component of climate change - referring to changes in temperature. #DayofFacts
  32. Global warming doesn’t mean that every place on Earth will be warmer. While ice is melting some places, it’s growing in others. #DayofFacts
  33. Climate change encompasses other changes, such as changes to precipitation patterns and the intensity of severe weather events. #DayofFacts
  34. Climate change refers to distinct changes in weather patterns that last for decades. #DayofFacts
  35. Since late 1700s, human activities have contributed large amounts of natural & man-made greenhouse gases #DayofFacts https://t.co/nW7kqfGQeR
    Since late 1700s, human activities have contributed large amounts of natural & man-made greenhouse gases #DayofFacts pic.twitter.com/nW7kqfGQeR
  36. These gases include greenhouse gases which are responsible for the greenhouse effect that regulates Earth’s temperature. #DayofFacts
  37. Carbon Dioxide (CO2) levels are the highest humans have ever experienced. #DayofFacts
  38. 1750 - CO2 in the air = 280ppm | 2016 – CO2 in the air 400ppm #DayofFacts
  39. Records of global surface temperature show an increase of 1.8° F since the late 19th century. #DayofFacts
  40. 1 or 2 degrees might seem a minor variation for us, but not for our planet. #DayofFacts
  41. A change in Earth’s avg temp can affect other aspects of global functioning & can cause sea levels to rise #DayofFacts
  42. It can also increase the frequency of extreme weather events, droughts, and floods. #DayofFacts
  43. Humans can deal w/ climate change more effectively than plants & animals. #DayofFacts
  44. Climate change also accelerates habitat destruction. #DayofFacts
  45. The Great Lakes support a variety of species. Warmer waters will impact their wildlife & vegetation #DayofFacts
  46. You can learn more about the threats facing the Great Lakes at our FREE panel on 2/23! https://t.co/NNpg9CkqlH https://t.co/MLv0e3ZEWF
    You can learn more about the threats facing the Great Lakes at our FREE panel on 2/23!  http://Naturemuseum.org/lakemichigan  pic.twitter.com/MLv0e3ZEWF
  47. For 160 years, we’ve counted hundreds of noted scientists and researchers among our museum staff and partners. #DayofFacts
  48. Our scientists are working to help restore species that are impacted by climate change & habitat loss. #DayofFacts
  49. Blanding’s turtles are endangered in Illinois, and we’re proud to be a partner in the Blanding’s Turtle Restoration Program. #DayofFacts
  50. Scientists have found that the main reason Blanding’s have become endangered is because of habitat loss. #DayofFacts https://t.co/aOHw2fdwd9
    Scientists have found that the main reason Blanding’s have become endangered is because of habitat loss. #DayofFacts pic.twitter.com/aOHw2fdwd9
  51. A big question we are currently trying to answer about Blanding’s - “Does headstarting turtles help them survive in the wild?” #DayofFacts
  52. Headstarting means that we raise the hatchling turtles for 1-2 years at the Museum before releasing them into @dupageforest #DayofFacts
  53. Each year we release over 100 headstarted turtles into the wild. #DayofFacts
  54. Climate change also poses a threat to Blanding’s turtles, however, as well as other reptile species. #DayofFacts
  55. The gender of hatchling Blanding’s turtles is determined by incubation temps. Warmer temps = females, cooler temps = males #DayofFacts
  56. If climate change continues to raise avg temps, we could reach a point where there are only female turtles hatching & no males #DayofFacts
  57. Another reptile we work closely with is the smooth green snake. #DayofFacts https://t.co/bGQl9n7bKz
    Another reptile we work closely with is the smooth green snake. #DayofFacts pic.twitter.com/bGQl9n7bKz
  58. Smooth green snakes are declining due to loss of habitat for both the snakes and their prey. #DayofFacts
  59. We are raising juvenile snakes for eventual release into the wild & studying techniques to help the snake population recover. #DayofFacts
  60. You can support our work with smooth green snakes here:  http://bit.ly/peggy-snake 
  61. Unfortunately, populations of native bees have dropped, along with domesticated honey bees. #DayofFacts
  62. Rusty patched bumble bees have recently experienced a 87% population decrease. #DayofFacts
  63. Diseases, loss of grassland habitat, and use of pesticides have all played a role in the rusty patched bumble bee’s decline. #DayofFacts
  64. We are working to study and restore this important species. You can support our work here:  http://bit.ly/peggy-bee  #DayofFacts
  65. Since the 1980s, CAS/PNNM scientists have been working on restoring habitats of threatened & endangered Illinois butterflies. #DayofFacts
  66. For over 15 yrs, our scientists have been raising threatened & endangered butterflies-eg swamp metalmarks & regal fritillaries. #DayofFacts
  67. This is so that we can release them in hopes that they will be able live & reproduce. #DayofFacts https://t.co/kA55WYvtGB
    This is so that we can release them in hopes that they will be able live & reproduce. #DayofFacts pic.twitter.com/kA55WYvtGB
  68. We are also working closely with other partners on efforts around the monarch butterfly. #DayofFacts https://t.co/LrexTTu5WX
    We are also working closely with other partners on efforts around the monarch butterfly. #DayofFacts pic.twitter.com/LrexTTu5WX
  69. The monarch population has dropped significantly in recent years, possibly due in part to loss of milkweed. #DayofFacts
  70. We teach over 5,000 students & community partners about monarchs through more than 200 workshops each year. #DayofFacts
  71. This outreach emphasizes the importance of creating monarch habitats & fosters personal connections with this iconic insect. #DayofFacts
  72. You can support our work with monarch butterflies by going here:  http://bit.ly/peggy-monarch  #dayoffacts
  73. You can learn more about all of our priority species and our conservation work here:  http://buff.ly/2lHrDRR  #DayofFacts
  74. Museum collections also play an important part in documenting effects of climate change and aiding conservation efforts. #DayofFacts
  75. For example, collection data can help a scientist compare present distribution of cricket frogs in IL w/ historic distribution. #DayofFacts
  76. Collection data have contributed to our understanding that cricket frogs have disappeared from much of their former range. #DayofFacts
  77. Through such natural history specimens, we have a physical, empirical record of the past. #DayofFacts https://t.co/ZXl5SFEtMd
    Through such natural history specimens, we have a physical, empirical record of the past. #DayofFacts pic.twitter.com/ZXl5SFEtMd
  78. We can use these specimens to interpret our present place in history which then allows us to anticipate future conditions. #DayofFacts
  79. The specimens in a natural history collection are like physical snapshots in time. They record data that cannot be reproduced. #DayofFacts
  80. e.g. peregrine falcon egg shells from 1800’s are thicker & have a stronger calcium/phosphorus matrix than those from 1960’s #DayofFacts
  81. As a result of their weaker shells, peregrines became extirpated (locally extinct) in the eastern ¾ of the US. #DayofFacts
  82. Using specimens, scientists could quantify the effect of bioaccumulated toxins like DDT on egg shell strength & composition. #DayofFacts
  83. The species has largely recovered, but the genetics of the population have changed. #DayofFacts
  84. All of this is known because of specimens that were collected and preserved before the crisis occurred. #DayofFacts
  85. These facts can seem overwhelming, but through collective efforts, we can have a real impact on climate change & conservation. #DayofFacts
  86. You can learn about what u can do to help the Great Lakes at our FREE upcoming panel on 2/23 https://t.co/NNpg9CkqlH https://t.co/AxLgCWp0Sb
    You can learn about what u can do to help the Great Lakes at our FREE upcoming panel on 2/23  http://Naturemuseum.org/lakemichigan  pic.twitter.com/AxLgCWp0Sb
  87. One of the easiest ways to get involved is by participating in our Chicago Conservation Corps (@ChiConservation) program. #DayofFacts
  88. For 10 yrs, @ChiConservation has recruited, trained & supported a network of volunteer leaders. #DayofFacts https://t.co/NTnpgEOffn
    For 10 yrs, @ChiConservation has recruited, trained & supported a network of volunteer leaders. #DayofFacts pic.twitter.com/NTnpgEOffn
  89. These C3 leaders work to improve the quality of life across all of Chicago’s 50 wards. #DayofFacts https://t.co/lB9La747e0
    These C3 leaders work to improve the quality of life across all of Chicago’s 50 wards. #DayofFacts pic.twitter.com/lB9La747e0
  90. To date, C3 has trained 674 leaders who have completed 652 projects. #DayofFacts
  91. Those C3 leaders have engaged 87,881 community members through their projects. #DayofFacts
  92. All told, C3 leaders and project teams have contributed 60,944 service hours. #DayofFacts https://t.co/n4M58bCNJm
    All told, C3 leaders and project teams have contributed 60,944 service hours. #DayofFacts pic.twitter.com/n4M58bCNJm
  93. To get involved in C3, learn about our upcoming orientations here:  http://naturemuseum.org/c3  #DayofFacts
  94. Another way to get involved is by learning about the volunteer opportunities that exist in the city. #DayofFacts
  95. Feb 26, we’ll be hosting our free @ChicagoVolExpo, feat. dozens of local organizations that touch all areas of service. #DayofFacts
  96. Another great program that allows volunteers to support conservation efforts around bumble bees is @BeeSpotter #DayofFacts
  97. Learn about planting for pollinators by downloading our Plants for Pollinators brochure:  http://naturemuseum.org/gardensale  #dayoffacts
  98. And stay tuned for details about our upcoming Plants for Pollinators Garden Sale. #DayofFacts
  99. Every action we take in our own lives can play a role in mitigating the impacts of climate change. #dayoffacts
  100. For each gallon of gas poured into its tank, a car emits about 25 lbs of CO2. #DayofFacts
  101. Walking, cycling and using public transit can help reduce emissions. #dayoffacts
  102. Skipping meat for one meal per week could save the greenhouse gas emissions equivalent of driving almost 1200 miles. #dayoffacts
  103. By gardening, you increase the natural habitat in ur yard & provide space & food for important species, like bees & butterflies #dayoffacts
  104. By advocating for habitat corridors & animal-friendly overpasses we can provide safe spaces for species to travel. #dayoffacts
  105. One 75-watt incandescent bulb burning for 2 hrs/day can generate 6 lbs of CO2 per month! Remember to turn off lights! #DayofFacts
  106. Washing clothes on “cold” could save 1.2-14.9 lbs of CO2 per load of laundry. #DayofFacts
  107. You can learn more about climate change at our upcoming exhibit Our House. Stay tuned for additional details! #DayofFacts
  108. You can also subscribe to our email newsletter to receive news about our conservation work… #DayofFacts
  109. …as well as notifications about upcoming climate change-themed programs  http://buff.ly/2lr6NFL  #DayofFacts
  110. You can learn more about Earth’s changing climate by checking out @NASA’s site here:  http://climate.nasa.gov/  #DayofFacts
  111. You can also read up on Chicago’s Climate Action Plan here:  http://buff.ly/2lrcxiD  #DayofFacts
  112. There are also lots of opportunities to give back through citizen science. #DayofFacts
  113. You can monitor butterfly populations via the Illinois Butterfly Monitoring Network.  http://buff.ly/2kH53EC  #DayofFacts
  114. You can monitor dragonfly and damselflies via the Illinois Odonate Survey:  http://buff.ly/2kH53EC  #DayofFacts
  115. You can monitoring calling frog species via the Calling Frog Survey:  http://buff.ly/2kH53EC  #dayofFacts
  116. Monitoring butterfly, dragonfly & frog species can help us understand the threats they face, as well as population changes. #DayofFacts
  117. You can learn how you can get involved with all of our citizen science programs here:  http://buff.ly/2kH53EC  #DayofFacts
  118. Collective action made a difference in the past, and it can make a difference again! #DayofFacts

 

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