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Contents tagged with winter solstice

  • Why Should the Summer Solstice Soak Up the Entire Spotlight?

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    Tags: winter solstice, public programs, green gifting, hot cider

    Created: 12/21/2012      Updated: 8/10/2016

    Cannon the bison with holiday wreath

    The focus of the Winter Solstice is often that it is the shortest day of the year, the day with the most darkness and least sunlight. I, however, prefer to think of it as an essential day to be celebrated. Without the tilting of the earth’s axis, we would not have the four distinct seasons that give us so much joy here in Chicago.

    For thousands of years, the Winter Solstice and nature’s harvest have been celebrated by cultures all over the world.  The day signifies nature’s rhythm; it’s a time of growth and renewal as the days begin to lengthen and plants and animals begins its push through winter to ensure a bountiful spring.

    During the peak of the holiday season – when people tend to feel stressed with last-minute details – the Winter Solstice is a reminder to pause, rejuvenate and reconnect with nature.

    And where better to do that than right here at the Nature Museum, the urban gateway to nature and science.

    In recognition of the Winter Solstice today, the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum is celebrating its significance to nature with two days of activities. We invite everyone to join in on the fun.

    • Friday, 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.: Hot cider, Make Your Own Bird Feeder, Critter Connections.
    • Saturday, 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.: Green gifting and hot cider.

    Happy Winter Solstice, Happy Holidays and Happy New Year.

    Naturally,

    Deb Lahey

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