Print Logo

Contents tagged with herpetology

  • May Happenings at the Chicago Herpetological Society and CJHS

    Share

    Tags: herpetology, herps, chicago herpetological society, snakes, Turtle, reptiles

    Created: 4/24/2015      Updated: 8/2/2016

    The first full weekend of every month, the Nature Museum becomes a herpetologist haven! That's when the Chicago Herpetological Society sets up tables in the Nature Walk for some reptile fun with the public and the Junior Herp Society holds their monthly meetings! Come and join us as we share our passion for these wonderful animals.

     

    Junior Herp Society logoChicago Herpetological Society logo

    Join us for some fun with our reptile and amphibian friends!

    The Chicago Junior Herpetological Society is about sharing the love of amphibians and reptiles with the younger generation, and fostering an appreciation of wildlife and nature through educational speakers and hands-on interaction.

    The regular monthly meetings of the Chicago Junior Herpetological Society take place at The Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum, on the Sunday of the first full weekend every month, from noon till about 1:30. Meetings are free to visitors to the museum. The next meeting will be on Sunday, May 3rd. Our scheduled topic is "Herping Responsibly" which is the observation of these animals in their natural habitat and respect for nature and the animals while we do that. We are looking forward to this and we are also planning a trip out to Channahon, IL to do some actual field herping with our March speaker, Ranger Kevin Luby from the Willowbrook Wildlife Center on May 30th. We are developing plans to start utilizing the skills and knowledge of some of our teenage members as leader mentors which has been a goal of ours since the beginning. We had alot of fun at our trip to Brookfield Zoo on April 4th and we are very grateful to our friends at the zoo for helping to make that a wonderful day.

    You can learn more about the CJHS here.

    Junior Herp Society Members on a field trip   Junior Herp Society Members on a field trip

    The Chicago Herpetological Society is a non-profit all volunteer organization dedicated to the conservation of all wildlife, especially reptiles and amphibians, the cooperation of amateur and professional herpetologists toward a more complete understanding of herpetofauna, and the education of the general public about these often misunderstood but fascinating animals.​

    When considering getting a new pet for the family, a great option to consider is adoption. There are many awesome animals out there in need of a loving home. The CHS has an adoption program available to members. There are currently some awesome animals being fostered and ready for a new forever home. Contact Colleen Schwarz or Linda Malawy of the CHS adoption program.

    You can learn more about CHS adoptions here.

    Two bearded dragons   Woman holding snakes

    The Junior Herp Society was founded by members of the Chicago Herpetological Society and we encourage our members to become members of the CHS as well. General meetings of the Chicago Herpetological Society are held on the last Wednesday every month at 7:30pm at the Notebaert. Meetings are free to attend. The April 29th meeting of the Chicago Herpetological Society will feature Scott Ballard of the Illinois Department of Natural Resources. Mr. Ballard is the author of the Illinois Herptiles-Herps Act that went into effect the beginning of this year. Everyone in Illinois who owns a reptile or amphibian or enjoys field herping needs to review this new law, but it’s particularly important for breeders, native animal keepers, and keepers of large or venomous animals. Talk with the man who wrote the law. 

    You can learn more about the Chicago Herpetological Society here.

    Thanks and hope to see you there!

    Rich Lamszus
    Chicago Junior Herp Society
    Chicago Herpetological Society

    View Comments

  • Meet Some of the Stars of National Frog Month

    Share

    Tags: critter connection, herpetology, frogs, toads, national frog month

    Created: 4/8/2015      Updated: 8/2/2016

    Subscribe to the Nature Museum blog and never miss a post!

    April is National Frog Month, and we're marking it with weekly frog and toad-focused live feedings, as well as weekly frog and toad Critter Connections. Since these toad-ally cool critters are going to be in the spotlight this month, we thought we would take a closer look at the different species you might find in Mysteries of the Marsh and our Look-In Lab.

    Northern Leopard Frog

    Northern Leopard Frog

    Although they can have lots of color variations, the most common variations are green and brown. As the name implies, they are distinguishable by the large, dark circular spots on their back, sides and legs, which are normally bordered by a lighter ring. They're often found in ponds, swamps, marshes, and slow-moving streams, preferring to inhabit bodies of water that have abundant aquatic vegetation. In the summer, they'll actually leave the ponds and move to grassier areas and lawns. 

    Pickerel Frog

    Pickerel Frog

    Although the Pickerel and Leopard frogs are similar at a glance, you can tell them apart by taking a closer look at their spots -- while Leopard Frogs have circular spots, Pickerels have irregular rectangular spots. Pickerel Frogs are also uncommon in Illinois, while Leopard Frogs are widesparead. Northern Pickerel Frogs prefer to live near cold, clear water, preferring rocky ravines, bogs and meadow streams. They can also be found around lakes and rivers that are heavily wooded. Unlike many of our other native frogs, Pickerels have a unique defense mechanism -- they can emit skin secretions which are actually toxic to some predators. For humans, the secretions generally only cause skin irritation, but it's important to wash your hands after handling them. This clever defense mechanism makes the Pickerel the only poisonous frog native to the United States!

    Northern Cricket Frog

    Northern Cricket Frog

    These small, warty frogs generally grow between 1.5 and 3.5 centimeters long. Unlike other frogs, they actually don’t have toe pads, which you can see if you look closely. They can be gray, brown or green and prefer open, shallow water with plenty of vegetation. And, as you probably guessed, their calls resemble that of a cricket.

    Gray Tree Frog

    Gray Tree Frog

    While their name suggests that they're only gray in color, Gray Tree Frogs are generally gray, green or brown depending on what they’re sitting on. They can actually change their camouflage from nearly black to nearly white, though they do change at a slower rate than a chameleon. Also, as their name would suggest, they're common in forested areas and are highly arboreal. In fact, they rarely ever descend from the treetops, with the main exception of breeding. Their calls are often heard in rural residential areas of the east coast and Midwest.

    Want more National Frog Month fun? Hop on over to our Instagram account! We'll be featuring a new frog or toad friend every Friday as part of our month-long #FrogFriday series. Not on Instagram? You can still follow along by jumping over to our Twitter account or Facebook page!

    Subscribe to the Nature Museum blog and never miss a post!

    View Comments

  • March & April Happenings at the Chicago Herpetological Society and CJHS

    Share

    Tags: chicago herpetological society, herpetology, junior herp society, reptiles, amphibians

    Created: 3/23/2015      Updated: 8/2/2016

    Subscribe to the Nature Museum blog and never miss a post!

    The first full weekend of every month, the Nature Museum becomes a herpetologist haven! That's when the Chicago Herpetological Society sets up tables in the Nature Walk for some reptile fun with the public and the Junior Herp Society holds their monthly meetings! The Notebaert is an awesome and beautiful place to go and reconnect with nature during these colder months.

    Junior Herp Society logo Members at a Junior Herp Society meeting, with an alligator snapping turtle

    Join us for some fun with our reptile and amphibian friends!

    The Chicago Junior Herpetological Society is about sharing the love of amphibians and reptiles with the younger generation, and fostering an appreciation of wildlife and nature through educational speakers and hands-on interaction.

    The regular monthly meetings of the Chicago Junior Herpetological Society take place at The Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum, on the Sunday of the first full weekend every month, from noon till about 1:30. Meetings are free to visitors to the museum. We are sad to announce the cancellation of the April 5th meeting as scheduled. We made an error in planning and did not see that this will be Easter Sunday and many of us have other plans that day. We have some friends at the Brookfield Zoo and they generously helped us to arrange a behind-the-scenes tour for the kids there on Saturday, April 4th. We had good response to this and it should be fun. The next meeting will be on Sunday, May 3rd. Our scheduled speaker is Matt Bordeux and he will be discussing field herping, which is the observation of these animals in their natural habitat. We are looking forward to this an we are also planning a trip out to Channahon, IL to do some actual field herping with last month's speaker, Ranger Kevin Luby from the Willowbrook Wildlife Center on May 30th. 

    You can learn more about the CJHS here.

    Girl with a snake  Closeup of a man's hand holding a snake

    The Chicago Herpetological Society is a non-profit all volunteer organization dedicated to the conservation of all wildlife, especially reptiles and amphibians, the cooperation of amateur and professional herpetologists toward a more complete understanding of herpetofauna, and the education of the general public about these often misunderstood but fascinating animals.​

    When considering getting a new pet for the family, a great option to consider is adoption. There are many awesome animals out there in need of a loving home. The CHS has an adoption program available to members. There are currently some awesome animals being fostered and ready for a new forever home. Contact Colleen Schwarz or Linda Malawy of the CHS adoption program.

    You can learn more about CHS adoptions here.

    Chicago Herpetological Society logoBearded Dragons with Chicago Herpetological Society promo card

    The Junior Herp Society was founded by members of the Chicago Herpetological Society and we encourage our members to become members of the CHS as well. General meetings of the Chicago Herpetological Society are held on the last Wednesday every month at 7:30pm at the Notebaert. Meetings are free to attend. This month's meeting will feature guest speaker Danny Mendez. He'll be discussing Raising Ethical Standards in Herpetoculture.

    We regret to announce the cancellation of ReptileFest 2015, which was planned for April 11 and 12, due to a cancellation of our venue due to unforseen circumstances. We are currently working on the best possible venue for ReptileFest 2016 and we hope to make this better than ever.

    You can learn more about the Chicago Herpetological Society here.

    Hope to see you there!

    Rich Lamszus
    Chicago Junior Herp Society
    Chicago Herpetological Society

    View Comments

  • Taking a Closer Look at Howard K. Gloyd

    Share

    Tags: Chicago Academy of Sciences, herpetology, snakes, howard k gloyd

    Created: 2/9/2015      Updated: 8/2/2016

    Subscribe to the Nature Museum blog and never miss a post!

    Chicago Academy of Sciences Director and herpetologist Howard Kay Gloyd was born 113 years ago today.

    Howard Gloyd on expedition

    Born in DeSoto, Kansas, Gloyd taught at Ottawa University, the Agricultural College of Kansas State University and the University of Michigan before joining the Chicago Academy of Sciences in 1936 as Academy Director. It was also around this time that he became vice president of the American Society of Icthyologists and Herpetologist and was a consultant for the State Natural History Survey of Illinois. While at the Academy, Gloyd worked to expand the Academy’s scientific publications and additions to the Academy’s public lecture series, and still conducted his own personal research on snakes with a special emphasis on rattlesnakes.

    Gloyd’s focus on rattlesnakes led him to organize three separate expeditions to Arizona, with the first in 1936, the second in 1940, and the third in 1946. The specimens he acquired during these expeditions are actually still in our collections. Although Gloyd left the Academy in 1958, he continued to remain an important figure in the world of herpetology, describing new species (like the Florida cottonmouth snake) and holding various lecturer and research associate positions at the University of Arizona which culminated in his appointment as Emeritus Professor of Zoology at U of A. He held this position until his death in 1978.

    In addition to his contributions to our collections, Gloyd continues to be connected to the Nature Museum. Two of the snake species featured in our living collections are actually his herpetological namesakes. The Eastern Fox Snake (Elaphe vuplina gloydi) was named for Gloyd by Roger Conant in 1940, while the Western Hognose Snake subspecies the Dusty Hognose Snake (Heterodon nasicus gloydi) was named for Gloyd by Richard A. Edgren in 1952. You may have met some of our own Fox Snakes, like Toblerone, during our Critter Connections, and if you’ve wandered through Mysteries of the Marsh, you’ve no doubt seen our own beautiful Western Hognose Snake!

    Eastern Fox SnakeWestern Hognose Snake

    Eastern Fox Snake and Western Hognose Snake, both named for Howard K. Gloyd

    You can learn more about Howard K. Gloyd by checking out the resource below.

    Biographies of People Honored in the Names of the Reptiles and Amphibians of North America

    Subscribe to the Nature Museum blog and never miss a post!

    View Comments

  • January Happenings at the Chicago Herpetological Society and CJHS

    Share

    Tags: chicago herpetological society, junior herp society, herpetology, snakes, reptiles, turtles, amphibians

    Created: 12/29/2014      Updated: 8/24/2015

    Subscribe to the Nature Museum blog and never miss a post!

    The first full weekend of every month, the Nature Museum becomes a herpetologist haven! That's when the Chicago Herpetological Society sets up tables in the Nature Walk for some reptile fun with the public and the Junior Herp Society holds their monthly meetings! The Notebaert is an awesome and beautiful place to go and reconnect with nature during these colder months

    Join us for some fun with the animals!

    The Chicago Junior Herpetological Society is about sharing the love of amphibians and reptiles with the younger generation, and fostering an appreciation of wildlife and nature through educational speakers and hands-on interaction.

    The regular monthly meetings of the Chicago Junior Herpetological Society take place at The Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum, on the Sunday of the first full weekend every month, from noon till about 1:30. Meetings are free to members of the CHS and visitors to the museum. The next meeting will be on Sunday, January 4th. Frank Sladek will be speaking about enrichment items and training techniques that benefit the health of your reptiles and promote natural behaviors. He will have a few short videos of reptiles being "trained" and possibly a related craft idea

    You can learn more about the CJHS here.

    The Chicago Herpetological Society is a non-profit all volunteer organization dedicated to the conservation of all wildlife, especially reptiles and amphibians, the cooperation of amateur and professional herpetologists toward a more complete understanding of herpetofauna, and the education of the general public about these often misunderstood but fascinating animals.​

    When considering getting a new pet for the family, a great option to consider is adoption. There are many awesome animals out there in need of a loving home. The CHS has an adoption program available to members. There are currently some ball pythons, turtles and other great critters being fostered and ready for a new forever home. Contact Colleen Schwarz or Linda Malawy of the CHS adoption program.

    You can learn more about CHS adoptions here.

    General meetings of the Chicago Herpetological Society are held on the last Wednesday every month at 7:30pm at the Notebaert, with the exception of New Year's Eve this year. That meeting has been changed to Tuesday, Dec. 30th. Meetings are free to attend. Our December meeting will feature CHS news and announcements and will be our holiday get together. We will have food there and encourage people to bring something to share if you can. Our meeting on January 28th will feature the epic Erica Mede, speaking about her work with ARAV, The Association of Reptile and Amphibian Veterinarians. We are also gearing up for next year’s ReptileFest, the nation’s largest educational herpetological event. ReptileFest 2015 will be on April 11 and 12, from 10am to 5pm in the University of Illinois Phys Ed building. Mark your calendars, this will be the 22nd year of this wonderful show.

    You can learn more about the Chicago Herpetological Society here and Reptilefest here.

    Hope to see you there!

    Rich Lamszus
    Chicago Junior Herp Society
    Newly elected Vice President of
    The Chicago Herpetological Society

    Subscribe to the Nature Museum blog and never miss a post!

    View Comments

  • Join the Chicago Herpetological Society for Cold-Blooded Weekends at the Museum

    Share

    Tags: living collections, herpetology, snakes, reptiles, amphibians, turtles, museum events

    Created: 10/20/2014      Updated: 8/8/2016

    Subscribe to the Nature Museum blog and never miss a post!

    The first full weekend of every month, the Nature Museum becomes a herpetologist haven! That's when the Chicago Herpetological Society and the Junior Herp Society hold their monthly meetings, and invite the public to join in on the fun. What is the Herpetological Society? In this post, the Chicago Herpetological Society's Rich Lamszus introduces us to it.

    Chicago Herpetological Society logoJunior Herp Society logo

    The Chicago Junior Herpetological Society

    The Chicago Junior Herpetological Society is about sharing the love of amphibians and reptiles with the younger generation, and fostering an appreciation of wildlife and nature through educational speakers and hands-on interaction.

    Children holding baby snakes in Junior Herp Society meeting

    The goal of the CJHS is to establish a learning environment where younger kids are mentored by older kids with knowledge of reptiles and amphibians, under adult supervision, in the beautiful museum setting. The regular monthly meetings of the Chicago Junior Herpetological Society take place at The Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum, on the Sunday of the first full weekend every month, from noon till about 1:30. Meetings are free to members of the CHS and visitors to the museum. 

    The next meeting will be on November 2 and will be our second anniversary meeting. Our speaker will be Yvette Mendez and her topic will be Reptile Parents and Reptile Babies. Colleen’s Critter Corner will feature frilled lizards and blue tongued skinks and differences in keeping them. 

    You can learn more about the CJHS here.

    The Chicago Herpetological Society

    The Chicago Herpetological Society is a non-profit all volunteer organization dedicated to the conservation of all wildlife, especially reptiles and amphibians, the cooperation of amateur and professional herpetologists toward a more complete understanding of herpetofauna, and the education of the general public about these often misunderstood but fascinating animals.​

    Visitors as Junior Herp Society meeting

    The CHS, established in 1966, is made up of hundreds of people who love reptiles and amphibians and want to do what they can to help other people understand this not-so-mainstream devotion. From encouraging the public not to fear snakes, to helping someone learn how to take care of her brand new gecko, we are spreading knowledge and spreading compassion for these creatures who are so often labeled in a negative way. We welcome anyone who shares our passion to join us! General meetings of the Chicago Herpetological Society are held on the last Wednesday every month at 7:30pm at the Notebaert, with the exception of Christmas Eve this year. Meetings are free to attend. 

    The next meeting on October 29 will feature news and announcements, an awesome raffle and our speaker will be Chris Gillette. The topic will be “Behavior of American alligators and crocodiles in captive and wild situations”. We are also gearing up for next year’s ReptileFest, the nation’s largest educational herpetological event. ReptileFest 2015 will be on April 11 and 12, from 10am to 5pm in the University of Illinois Phys Ed building. Mark your calendars, this will be the 22nd year of this wonderful show. You can learn more about the Herpetological Society here, and learn more about ReptileFest here.

    Hope to see you there!

    Rich Lamszus

    CHS, CJHS

    Subscribe to the Nature Museum blog and never miss a post!

    View Comments

 
Close
Mobile navigation