Print Logo

Contents tagged with flowers

  • Donald T. Ries Photography Collection: A Museum Intern's Perspective

    Share

    Tags: Archives, photography, 35mm slides, Donald T. Ries, flowers, botany

    Created: 10/8/2013      Updated: 8/9/2016

    Subscribe to the Nature Museum blog and never miss a post!

    Donald T. Ries passed away in 1967. For the past four months I have been the Collections-Photography Intern for the Collections Department, cataloguing Ries’ work that is housed in the Archive. When I applied for the position, I thought I was going to be working more with cameras or scanners, and while that may still be in store for Ries' collection my job so far entails cataloguing, researching, and identifying the subjects of his photographs.

    In 1969, Ries' sisters donated over 10,000 of his nature photography images, in the form of 35 mm slides and black and white negatives to the Academy. Ries’ collection was accessioned into the collection all those years ago but methods for cataloguing have since become more rigorous. Luckily for me, the museum has not had the resources to allocate towards addressing those changes, so Amber and Dawn brought me in to start attending to those needs. Throughout the process I have gained hands-on experience with contemporary cataloguing techniques and object handling. I have also seen just how time consuming and arduous managing and maintaining a museum collection can be; a great lesson for a museum studies graduate student like me.

    Drawers from the storage cabinet received with the Donald T. Ries photography donation

    Drawers from the storage cabinet received with the Donald T. Ries photography donation

    I have thoroughly enjoyed getting to know Donald T. Ries. From my personal research, I found that Ries was a biology professor at Illinois State University and he belonged to an amateur photography club, from which he won several awards. He spent his summers pursuing and working on his passion for nature photography by researching and recording different natural environments and their inhabitants. Ries then spent the time to label most of his images with the appropriate scientific name or taxonomy.

    Chimaphila umbellata, Pipissewa or Prince’s Pine

    Image of Chimaphila umbellata, Pipissewa or Prince’s Pine

    Part of cataloguing Ries’ images involves using the USDA Plants database to verify and confirm the information on Ries’ labels. The database also maps the natural habitats for the flora I am investigating, highlighting the states where they grow naturally. Those maps and the dates on Ries’ slides allow me to “play detective,” inferring in what regions of the country Ries was when he took certain images. My favorite part of the internship has been mentally mapping Ries' travels. I imagine him preferring a trip to southern Canada in July where the Lady Slipper Orchid might be in bloom over a vacation at a beach resort in some tropical climate.

    Cypripedium arietinum, Ram’s Head Lady’s Slipper

    Image of Cypripedium arietinum, Ram’s Head Lady’s Slipper

    Another rewarding aspect entails researching the unidentified slides, trying to find and attribute the correct taxonomy to the species in each image. With little more than a descriptive vocabulary and a growing understanding of the botanical language, I pore over hundreds of images from the Internet trying to discover the species of plant at which I am looking. I cannot describe the satisfaction I receive every time I scour through countless images, and find a flower similar to the slide I am studying; I found the clues necessary to unlock the riddle.

    Oxalis montana, Mountain Woodsorrel

    Image of Oxalis montana, Mountain Woodsorrel

    This experience provided a glimpse at how a Collections Department operates and increased my desire to work in museums. I also gained a greater appreciation for flowers as well as the work of avid nature photographers, even becoming adept at identifying previously unknown species of flowers in my friends’ backyards. Finally, I got to know this fellow photographer, developing a connection to him that could never have otherwise been made. I plan on continuing with the Donald T. Ries project as a volunteer and I am excited to continue working with and learning from the Collections staff at the Academy.

    Leonard M. Cicero
    Collections Department Intern/Volunteer

    Subscribe to the Nature Museum blog and never miss a post!

    View Comments

  • Horticultural Bottom Ten - Chicago Edition Part Two

    Share

    Tags: horticulture, genetics, flowers, plants, humor

    Created: 8/13/2013      Updated: 8/9/2016

    As predicted, Harper’s Horticultural Bottom Ten is well on its way to becoming an important, nay, essential treatise within the vast and tangled gallimaufry of gardening discourse. I am sorry for the delay in bringing you the next installment, gentle reader, but as you may well imagine, I have been wholly occupied accepting international awards, juggling requests for public appearances, and turning down marriage proposals. However, today I shall set aside these distractions, for the task at hand remains vital, and my expertise indispensable to its execution. So welcome, everyone, to the Bottom Ten Part Two: Unspeakable Lovecraftian Nightmare Edition!

    For those of you who don’t know what awesome is, H. P. Lovecraft was one of the 20th century’s most brilliant horror writers. If you’re unacquainted with his oeuvre, go read “The Thing at the Doorstep.” I’ll wait. Done? Cool. Good luck sleeping tonight. Lovecraft specializes in nurturing a crawling sense that someone or something within a story is…off. Unnatural. Distorted. Perverse. Then, in the final pages, when you’re good and creeped out, you finally encounter it: the Thing That Should Not Be.

    I am certainly no Lovecraft.  But I can recognize a hideous, forsaken monstrosity when I see it. I can tell when plant breeding has run disturbingly amok. Yes, gentle reader, I know them. I know the Plants That Should Not Be.

    Example 1:  Here is a normal coneflower…

    Purple coneflower

    …here is a ‘Greenline’ coneflower…

    Greenline coneflower with distinctive green coloring

    Eyeballs on stalks.  Watching you.  Forever.

    …and a ‘Green Wizard’ coneflower

    Green Wizard coneflower

    Kill it. With fire.

    Why? Just why? What disturbed compulsion forced otherwise well-intentioned plantsmen and women to create these botanical perversities? Are they pretty? Are they an improvement on the standard form?  The answer to both questions is a clear and resounding “no”.  Yet there they are. Living. Growing.

    Example 2:  Here is your standard daylily…

    Orange daylily

    Pretty!

    …and here is the cultivar ‘Sanford Double Doozy’.

    Sanford Double Doozy daylily

    (Not pretty.)

    Who did this? Who saw a daylily flower and thought it would look better disguised as a mutated, scum-crawling, deep-sea nudibranch? There is only one explanation. This must be the work of some ancient, cosmic horror lurking beyond the veil, pulling the strings on an unwitting, puppet horticulturist.     

    Example 3:  A typical daffodil…

    Daffodil

    …and a cultivar called ‘Delnashaugh’.

    Delnashaugh daffodil

    On quiet mornings, you can just make out the sound of its constant, pitiful weeping.

    Clearly, this daffodil is the product of a diseased mind. How else can one explain its nauseating jumble of contorted, flesh-colored protuberances? No one of sound faculties could ever conceive of creating something so unspeakable from a beloved harbinger of spring. Speaking of which…

    Example 4: Here is a tulip called ‘Rococo’.

    Rococo tulip

    Is it…bleeding?

    No.  No, no, no.  That is not a flower.  That is an incubus spawned from the unholy union of a cabbage and a stygian cacodemon.  Without doubt, its insatiable roots twist downward, downward, ever downward, though the inky, sulfurous miasmas of Tartarus, into the very gates of Gahenna, past the Well of Souls, finally plunging into the black, putrid soil of the Abyss. Any second now, its blood-caked petals will yawn open, revealing a hideous maw of toothy destruction. And it will scream. 

    My god, it will scream.

    Oh no.  I think it saw me!  I’ve got to get…blog…must finish…must warn…….

    Seth Harper, Horticulturist

    View Comments

 
Close
Mobile navigation