Print Logo

Contents tagged with PIP

  • Reducing your Holiday Impact

    Share

    Tags: public programs, PIP, recycle, upcycle

    Created: 12/20/2012      Updated: 8/10/2016

    As the holidays near, it’s even more important to consider the impact that our choices have on the environment. Between Thanksgiving and New Year’s, an additional 1 million tons of waste is generated per week in the U.S. This waste includes things like shopping bags, ribbon, wrapping paper, and over 2 billion holiday cards[1]

    So what can the average person do to reduce their own holiday impact? The good news is that there are many ways to make a difference.

    • Don’t forget your reusable shopping bags! Keep disposables out of the landfill by bringing a cloth bag, or reusing those grocery bags you have stashed under the cabinet.
    • Use newsprint to wrap gifts. Try the funny papers- it’s a unique and often unexpected way to package gifts that will help yours stand out.
    • Make your own holiday cards by “up cycling”! Save cards you receive throughout the year- cut them, tear them, and paste the pieces together to create new, one-of-a-kind designs.
    • Buy rechargeable batteries to accompany any electronics, and consider including a battery charger as part of the gift.
    • Consider durability and recyclability of gifts before you purchase. If it isn’t expected to last for years, can it be recycled?[2]

    Challenge your family to try one (or more) of these tips this holiday season and see what a difference it makes. Children can participate by keeping track of how many bags, rolls of wrapping paper & holiday cards you’ve saved from Thanksgiving to New Year’s Day.

    Have green gifting tips of your own? Please share in the comments.

    • Visitor crafting
    • Mosaic craft
    • Cutting out butterflies

    Want to learn more? Visit the Nature Museum throughout the holiday season for hands-on fun!

    Green Gifting

    Saturday, December 22 and Sunday, December 23
    11am to 1pm

    Join us in preparing for the holiday season by creating your own gifts for all of your friends and family at our "green gifting" craft workshop. All crafts will be environmentally friendly and nature oriented. Perfect for anyone on your list! Cost: $3/project, $5/two projects.

    Trash to Treasure
    Wednesday, December 26 through Saturday, December 29, 11am-2pm

    Bring your holiday trash (wrapping paper, boxes, cards, ribbon) to the Nature Museum to create Trash to Treasure thank you cards and create musical instruments to ring in New Year’s Day. Move, sing, and play with Lily Emerson, the Nature Museum’s Artist in Residence, in this special family workshop celebrating the sounds of the season. Cost: Free

    Heather Grance
    Manager of Public Interpretive Programs



    [1] California Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/PublicEd/Holidays/

    [2] U.S. Environmental Protection Agency http://www.epa.gov/osw/wycd/funfacts/winter.htm

    View Comments

  • What Do You Do On Your Day Off?

    Share

    Tags: PIP, volunteer, volunteering

    Created: 12/18/2012      Updated: 8/10/2016

    It’s Sunday afternoon and I have helped a group of second graders spot the queen of our leaf-cutter ant colony, held two fox snakes, acted as a perch for a bunch of newly hatched butterflies not quite ready to fly, and fed no less than three box turtles. What do you do on your day off? I am a Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum Public Interpretive Programs Volunteer, or just PIPster for short.

    I'm also a biology student working my way through school and busier than one of our rooftop honeybees. With work, school, and taking care of my canary, Ladybird, my week can be a little hectic. Yet, I have made it a priority to volunteer for the Nature Museum every Sunday.

    Stephanie Maxwell with butterfly

    I began volunteering here last spring after meeting a few past volunteers who couldn’t say enough good things about the Museum. As a newer student to biology, I had been searching for a way to get more experience to compliment my interest in local wildlife -- something more than a laboratory internship or research assistantship. Boy, did I hit the jackpot.

    Working as a PIP volunteer truly compliments the material I am learning in the classroom, but provides more of a hands-on perspective. Instead of reading about the territorial nature of red-winged blackbirds during the breeding season, I get to witness firsthand what happens when my coworkers venture too close to a nest while exploring the prairie (think Alfred Hitchcock).

    Working for the Museum has also solidified my desire to pursue a career in the wildlife rehabilitation field. Beginning my studies as a biologist, the most important thing that fueled me was my desire to affect this planet in a positive way through some kind of conservation effort; I just wasn’t sure how I could make that a reality. Saving all of the Bengal tigers in Nepal is a bit daunting for a 20 year old in Illinois to contemplate, you know?

    When I began talking to my fellow volunteers and really dove into what the Nature Museum is about -- preserving and protecting native Illinois wildlife while giving the public an opportunity for an authentic connection to nature -- that is when I found that concentrating on a local level is much more approachable to someone like me, and probably you as well.

    That is why I volunteer for the Nature Museum every Sunday. I get to introduce people to an amphibian they never even knew existed, let alone knew was in their backyard. I get to see the absolute wonder mixed with terror on a kindergartener’s face as they feel the scales on a snake for the first time. Volunteering as a PIPster is an amazing opportunity I wouldn’t have had in any other city, because there is no city that has a nature museum quite like ours here in Chicago.

    If you come across a volunteer in a green shirt the next time you’re visiting the museum, don’t hesitate to ask us questions! We’ll be sure to have an answer. I’ll see you on Sunday!

    Stephanie Maxwell
    Public Interpretive Programs Volunteer

    View Comments

 
Close
Mobile navigation