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Contents tagged with Endangered Species

  • The Endangered Species Print Project Brings New Attention to Rare Animals

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    Tags: Endangered Species, endangered species print project, jenny kendler, molly schafer, exhibit, rare nature

    Created: 9/26/2014      Updated: 8/24/2015

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    This week's post was contributed by artist Molly Schafer. Her work, along with that of her friend Jenny Kendler and other artists, can currently be seen at the Nature Museum as part of the "Rare Nature" exhibit (open through October 19). The exhibit features limited edition prints of endangered species, with proceeds going toward conservation efforts. In this post, Schafer describes the Endangered Species Print Project's origin story.

    Jenny and I met in graduate school at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago. We were both making art about the natural world. We talked about wanting to make more of a contribution to conservation efforts, but we were somewhat at a loss as to how since our skill set revolved around drawing and painting.

    Rare Nature exhibit

    "Rare Nature" exhibit currently on display at the Nature Museum (Photo by Jim Schafer)

    As children we both were obsessed with these illustrations of endangered species in outer space that decorated our folders and binders. The message of these images was that endangered species were magical and rare. As kids, that made them much neater to us than “regular” animals. As artists, it made us think of how monetary value is assigned to art objects. One of a kind, rare pieces are considered more desirable. The less endangered an animal was, the less precious it seemed, at least to our nerdy younger selves.

    Seychelles Sheathtailed Bat print

    Seychelles Sheath-tailed bat (Print by artist Molly Schafer)

    This unsettling thought gave us the concept for the Endangered Species Print Project (ESPP). ESPP creates art prints of endangered species with limited editions to mirror the small number of individuals remaining in the wild. For example, the Seychelles Sheath-tailed bat is critically endangered with only 37 individuals remaining, so the print-run is limited to 37 prints. Once all 37 prints are sold the edition is sold out. Proceeds from the sale of prints benefits the animal or plant represented in a print.

    We started the project in 2009 with Jenny and I creating the artwork for the prints. Today ESPP has raised almost $12,500 for conservation with 26 prints by 14 different artists. All contributing artists donate their time and finished work to bring attention to the extinction crisis.

    Visit Rare Nature at The Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum to see the prints and learn about the amazing variety of plants and animals that are endangered like the Vaquita (the world’s smallest porpoise), the Javan rhino (who is so rare it has barely been photographed), and the Guam Micronesian Kingfisher (a bird that is currently extinct in the wild but still has a chance thanks to a breeding program right here in Chicago).

    Molly Schafer and Jenny Kendler

    Molly Schafer & Jenny Kendler (Photo by Michael Czerepak)

    Molly Schafer

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  • Madison Vorva, Lending a Helping Hand in Nature's Struggle

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    Tags: Nature's Struggle, extinction, Endangered Species, orangutan, conservation, nature museum, palm oil

    Created: 9/11/2014      Updated: 8/9/2016

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    Today’s post was contributed by Madison Vorva of Project ORANGS. Madison and her friend Rhiannon Tomitshen founded Project ORANGS in 2007 to raise awareness about the plight of the orangutan and the deforestation tactics used to source palm oil. The pair have been spotlighted in our “Nature’s Struggle: Survival & Extinction” exhibit for their work.

    My first trip to the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum was in 2010 for Rishi Tea’s launch party with Dr. Jane Goodall. I was so excited to return to see the “Nature’s Struggle: Survival and Extinction” exhibit. The environmental problems our planet faces today are massive, with no “black and white” quick fix, but this exhibit does an excellent job of breaking down these complexities to kids. It is so important to empower young people to recognize that while nature is gravely threatened, we can each do something about it beginning with our everyday choices and unique passions.

    Madison Vorva in Nature's Struggle

    Today, I’m a 19-year-old sophomore at Pomona College, but I became an environmental activist when I was 11 years old. In 2007, I decided to earn my Girl Scout Bronze Award by raising awareness about the plight of the orangutan. I learned that their rainforest habitat in Indonesia and Malaysia is being rapidly deforested for palm oil plantations. In Indonesia, deforestation is responsible for 80% of the country’s carbon dioxide emissions, making it the third largest emitter of greenhouse gases in the world behind the United States and China. Today, palm oil is the most widely used vegetable oil in the world, and this ingredient is in about 50% of the products in American grocery stores.

    After learning that palm oil was in Girl Scout cookies, my friend and I launched Project ORANGS to get Girl Scouts USA to use a deforestation-free source of palm oil. Partnering with Climate Advisers, the Rainforest Action Network and the Union of Concerned Scientists, I’ve organized the support of over 140,000 consumers and my hero, Dr. Jane Goodall, through online petitions and letter writing campaigns. Through interviews in The Wall Street Journal, TIME Magazine, NPR, CBS’s Early Show, and ABC World News, millions of consumers have been educated about the impacts of their daily purchases. Working with the Philadelphia Zoo, we designed a “Guardian of the Rainforest” badge which hundreds of Scouts have earned (and you can too!). In 2011, Girl Scouts USA announced a palm oil policy, the first policy change driven by the efforts of girls in the organization’s 100+ year history. In 2014, Kellogg’s, a Girl Scout Cookie baker, announced a deforestation-free palm oil policy for its entire product line.

    Palm oil free cookies interactive in Nature'S Struggle exhibit

    For any museum visitor inspired by “Nature’s Struggle”, check out Jane Goodall’s Roots & Shoots program which supports young people making a difference for people, animals and the environment. No matter your age, never underestimate your ability to make our world more peaceful and just. As Dr. Jane says, “If you really want something, and really work hard, and take advantage of opportunities, and never give up, you will find a way.”

    Madison Vorva in Nature's Struggle exhibit

    Madison Vorva 

    Founder, Project ORANGS
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  • Chicago Butterflies in 2012- A Wild Year!

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    Tags: butterflies, Endangered Species, Drought, Climate

    Created: 10/5/2012      Updated: 8/10/2016

    It's been a wild year for butterflies in the Chicago area.  Heat and drought seem to be the catchwords of the year.  The season got off to an extraordinarily early start.  It's not all that unusual to see a few butterflies in March, as species like Mourning Cloaks that hibernate as adults sometimes venture out on warm days.  The prolonged hot spell in March brought a lot of species out, many over a month early.  These Spring Azures were photographed at Bluff Spring Fen on St. Patrick's Day.

    Spring Azure



    As the season settled in, the east central part of the US and Canada was overrun by an enormous population explosion of Red Admirals.  In April the wave of Red Admiral migration crossed northern Illinois, with numbers about ten times their normal levels.  As impressive as that was, the huge migration was even bigger in eastern Canada, where it was estimated that hundreds of millions of the butterflies were passing through.

    Red Admiral



    Not surprisingly given the early and very warm season, 2012 saw the influx of several butterfly species that normally fly further to the south.  Pipevine Swallowtails, Dainty Sulphurs (photo below), and Sachem skippers were all conspicuous in the Chicago area for much of the summer.  These species are typically either rare or absent this far north.  It will be interesting to compare data collected by the Illinois and Ohio butterfly monitoring networks to see if similar trends were observed in both of these states.

    Dainty Sulphur



    The news wasn't all good.  The drought seems to have taken a toll on some of the region's rare butterflies- those species that require remnant prairies or wetlands.  The Nature Museum's Butterfly Restoration Project made very little progress this year due to the very low numbers of these species that we encountered.  Species that were present in very low numbers this summer included Silver-bordered Fritillaries, Baltimore Checkerspots (photo below), and Regal Fritillaries.  With luck, conditions will be more favorable in 2013 and their numbers will rebound. 

    Baltimore Checkerspot



    Doug Taron, Curator of Biology

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