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Contents tagged with Climate

  • Behind the Scenes of Weather to Climate: Our Changing World

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    Tags: exhibit, climate, climate change, behind the scenes

    Created: 3/21/2016      Updated: 3/28/2016

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    weather to climate exhibit logo

    At the Chicago Academy of Sciences / Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum, we pride ourselves on producing self-created exhibits on timely issues that will resonate with our family audience. As we celebrate the rich history of our institution during its 160th anniversary, we are busy putting the finishing touches on our most ambitious exhibit yet, one that puts one of the most consequential issues of our time into perspective for families in a fun environment.

    On April 2nd, the Nature Museum will open Weather to Climate: Our Changing World. The exhibit will present in an accessible way the fundamentals of weather and climate, the science behind climate change, and what actions people can take to reduce our own impact. The exhibit will run through October 23, 2016 and drive a community-wide conversation about climate change.

    behind the scenes of weather to climate

    For the last two years — thanks in large part to a diverse collaboration of subject matter experts including Molly Woloszyn at the Midwestern Regional Climate Center and Illinois State Climatologist Jim Angel — we have immersed ourselves in this important issue. By creating Weather to Climate from the ground up, we were able to put a truly personal touch on the exhibit. Throughout this process, we worked hand-in-hand with our education department to make sure the interactive content is presented in a way that is easy to understand. In addition, the exhibit will facilitate ways for visitors to continue discussing climate change after they have left the Nature Museum. 

    This exhibit also represents our biggest foray into multi-media. The exhibit will feature interactive displays, video games, weather simulations, climate labs and more, including an immersive entry experience where guests can experience the sensations of different types of weather. From a design standpoint, it has been fascinating to see ideas initially scratched out on paper be transformed into active, dynamic content.

    behind the scenes of weather to climate

    In addition to the interactive, multi-media elements, the exhibit will also include a selection of animals from our living collections. The animals featured will represent some of the animals that are likely to experience an increase or decrease in population as a result of climate change.

    The Nature Museum is dedicated to creating a positive relationship between people and nature through collaborations, education, research and exhibitions such as Weather to Climate. As Chicago’s urban gateway to nature and science we could not be more proud to bring this global conversation to our own community. Join us on April 2nd as we open Weather to Climate and begin that dialogue.

    Alvaro Ramos
    Vice President and Curator of Museum Experience 

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  • Chicago Butterflies in 2012- A Wild Year!

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    Tags: butterflies, Endangered Species, Drought, Climate

    Created: 10/5/2012      Updated: 8/10/2016

    It's been a wild year for butterflies in the Chicago area.  Heat and drought seem to be the catchwords of the year.  The season got off to an extraordinarily early start.  It's not all that unusual to see a few butterflies in March, as species like Mourning Cloaks that hibernate as adults sometimes venture out on warm days.  The prolonged hot spell in March brought a lot of species out, many over a month early.  These Spring Azures were photographed at Bluff Spring Fen on St. Patrick's Day.

    Spring Azure



    As the season settled in, the east central part of the US and Canada was overrun by an enormous population explosion of Red Admirals.  In April the wave of Red Admiral migration crossed northern Illinois, with numbers about ten times their normal levels.  As impressive as that was, the huge migration was even bigger in eastern Canada, where it was estimated that hundreds of millions of the butterflies were passing through.

    Red Admiral



    Not surprisingly given the early and very warm season, 2012 saw the influx of several butterfly species that normally fly further to the south.  Pipevine Swallowtails, Dainty Sulphurs (photo below), and Sachem skippers were all conspicuous in the Chicago area for much of the summer.  These species are typically either rare or absent this far north.  It will be interesting to compare data collected by the Illinois and Ohio butterfly monitoring networks to see if similar trends were observed in both of these states.

    Dainty Sulphur



    The news wasn't all good.  The drought seems to have taken a toll on some of the region's rare butterflies- those species that require remnant prairies or wetlands.  The Nature Museum's Butterfly Restoration Project made very little progress this year due to the very low numbers of these species that we encountered.  Species that were present in very low numbers this summer included Silver-bordered Fritillaries, Baltimore Checkerspots (photo below), and Regal Fritillaries.  With luck, conditions will be more favorable in 2013 and their numbers will rebound. 

    Baltimore Checkerspot



    Doug Taron, Curator of Biology

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