Print Logo

Contents tagged with Chicago Film Archives

  • A Unique View: The Motion Film Cataloguing Project

    Share

    Tags: Chicago Academy of Sciences, collections, Collections Inventory Project, motion film, preservation, Chicago Film Archives, Gaylord and Dorothy Donnelley Foundation, Chicago Sun-Times Charity Trust, digitzation, environment, Midwest

    Created: 4/4/2014      Updated: 8/9/2016

    Background

    As part of the Collections Inventory Project, Collections staff with the Chicago Academy of Sciences and its Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum (CAS/PNNM) conducted an inventory and preliminary condition survey of the museum’s motion film collection in 2011. The majority of the over 1,300 films were original films created by Academy staff, Board members, and local naturalists, created between the mid 1920s and the 1980s. These films documented Academy field studies, local natural areas, and different species, as well as travel by Academy staff and Board members to conduct research for exhibits. Historically, these films were used regularly by the Academy in public programs and presentations. Now, the films were becoming increasingly fragile, and the information contained within their frames was found nowhere else.

    Preservation Issues

    The films were still in their original metal and cardboard containers and needed to be rehoused with archival quality materials. The original containers -- acidic papers, cardboard, adhesives -- were causing the film to deteriorate. 

    Original Leather Film Case

    Original metal and cardboard container

    The old metal reels caused breakage to the film and were susceptible to rust, which caused chemical deterioration of the film. Acid migration from papers and cardboard affected the film’s stability. Original paper labels glued onto the reels became detached over time, creating the potential for information to become disassociated.

    Original film cardboard boxes

    Film on original metal reels

    The Project

    Due to the fragility of the films, CAS/PNNM sought funding support to work with a contractor who had the equipment and expertise to work with historic motion films. In 2012, CAS/PNNM was awarded a $35,000 grant from the Gaylord and Dorothy Donnelley Foundation for the project. Matching funds were generously provided through a $25,000 grant from the Chicago Sun-Times Charity Trust and $10,000 in individual donations from our paddle raise at the Butterfly Ball. In November of that year, CAS/PNNM began working with the Chicago Film Archives (CFA) on its motion film cataloguing project.

    View from the Chicago Film Archives studio in Chicago.

    View from the Chicago Film Archives studio in Chicago.

    At the CFA’s studio, each film was individually assessed. Information about the film was catalogued, and included: subject matter, creator and publisher, date created, film stock, date code, footage, film gauge, and other physical attributes of the film. The CFA evaluated the condition of each film, noting shrinkage and warpage, physical damage, and color fading. A few were found with damage from mold of vinegar syndrome. 

    A film with tentite mold.

    A film with tentite mold. 

    Mold growth on emulsion of a film.

    Mold growth on emulsion of a film. 

    Vinegar syndrome is the process of the cellulose acetate film base degrading -- it is caused by humidity, and the film starts to warp, buckle, shrink, and give off a vinegary smell.

    Removed head of film with advanced vinegar syndrome.

    Removed head of film with advanced vinegar syndrome.

    The acetate base of the film is cracking due to vinegar syndrome.

    The acetate base of the film is cracking due to vinegar syndrome.

    The films were cleaned and minor repairs, such as repairing splices, were made to stabilize the films. The films were then outfitted with new archival cores, leaders, and containers to provide an inert micro-environment to help stabilize the films and protect them from further deterioration.

    Films being outfitted with a new archival core, leader, and container. Films being outfitted with a new archival core, leader, and container.

    Films being outfitted with a new archival core, leader, and container.

    Single frames from some of the films were also captured during CFA's assessment, providing visual references for several of the films in the collection. These digital images will be utilized to provide examples of the films’ contents for research requests, social media relating to the collection, grant proposals, among other uses.

    The project with the CFA was completed in February 2014, and the collection organized at the CAS/PNNM collections facility. A total of 1,356 films were verified and catalogued in the collection. The information resulting from the cataloguing and condition assessments gives our Collections staff a baseline with which to monitor the preservation of the films and additional data about the films to manage the collection.

    Updated film collection housed at the Ravenswood Collections Facility

    Future Plans

    The historic value of the films for conservation studies is immeasurable. Through this project, the Academy is developing a much clearer understanding of its motion film collection and how we might apply the unique field information contained within these frames. However, the films are fragile and projecting them with standard equipment would damage them. Digitally duplicating the films – the process of scanning the frames to produce a digital copy – would make the collection fully accessible. In 2007, the Academy had a small amount of its footage digitally transferred by the Film Video and New Media Department of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. This footage is shown in the Heritage exhibit at the Nature Museum and enjoyed by our visitors today. CAS/PNNM will use the information from the motion film cataloguing project to set priorities for digital duplication of the collection and will be seeking funding for this next project to provide broad access to these films.

    Dawn Roberts

    Collections Manager

    View Comments

  • Behind the Scenes: Motion Film Project

    Share

    Tags: Chicago Academy of Sciences, motion film, environment, Chicago Film Archives, Gaylord and Dorothy Donnelley Foundation, Chicago Sun-Times Charity Trust

    Created: 7/27/2013      Updated: 9/1/2015

    Subscribe to our RSS feed and never miss a blog posting!

    The Academy’s museum collection and archives includes 1,371 motion films that were created between the early 1920s and the 1970s. These original films document local ecosystems and plants and animals in their natural habitats.

    Motion film is highly susceptible to deterioration caused by temperature and humidity. With help from the Chicago Film Archives, these films are being described and catalogued, having simple repairs made, and rehoused with archival storage containers for long-term preservation. Thank you to the Gaylord and Dorothy Donnelley Foundation, the Chicago Sun-Times Charity Trust, and to individual donors for their support of this stage of the project!

    After the films are catalogued and stabilized, we will embark on the next phase: to increase the accessibility of the collection. Utilizing the original films would damage or even destroy them. Creating a digital copy of the films will allow the footage to be used and the original film to be protected.

    Here are some shots of the transformation of our film collection:

    Old film containers

    Many of the films were stored in metal canisters.

    Original metal reels

    Original metal reels caused breakage to the films and were susceptible to rust, resulting in chemical deterioration of the films. Some films had adhesive labels stuck to the sides, and the adhesive residue transferred to the films causing them to stick together.

    stack of 100' rolls in yellow boxes

    Stacks of small cardboard boxes with original 100’ rolls of film. Materials like this cause damage to films through acid migration.

    35mm films with boxes

    agfa 35mm films

    leather bound film container used for storage and mailing

    Leather bound film container used for storage and mailing.

    film showing signs of vinegar syndrome

    Some of the films suffer from vinegar syndrome, deterioration caused by humidity. The film exhibits warping and gives off a “vinegary” smell.

    recanning process

    Each film is wound onto an archival core, outfitted with a new leader, and then given an archival canister.

    archived film in cannisters

    Here are films that have been completely catalogued and rehoused. The new archival containers provide an inert micro-environment that helps stabilize the films and protect them from further deterioration.

    Dawn Roberts
    Collections Manager

    Subscribe to our RSS feed and never miss a blog posting! View Comments

 
Close
Mobile navigation